FRIENDS

                   OF

           BRIERDENE

friendsofbrierdene.org.uk

Species Information

This page will contain photos and information on all the New Species.


If we run out of new species we will use this page to display information on some of the species found in the Dene.





Total Number of Recorded Species in the Brierdene  31/12/2017

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 Groups  Number
 Arachnids
  31
  Bats    3
  Birds
   125
  Bugs & Beatles    47
    Bumblebees - Bees - Solitary Bees    13
Butterflies    21
   Centipedes    1
Crustaceans    5
   Dragonflies    6
Fish and Amphibians    5
  Flies    48
  Fungi    38
Harvestman    2
  Ladybirds    8
Mammals    9
  Molluscs    9
Lichen, Liverworts Mosses and Slime
Moulds
   121
  Moths & Miners   151
  Plants, Bushes & Trees    321
  Reptiles     1
  Wasps    8
 Worms    11
   


No new species were found during December

     


This Mushroom was found at the end of December.


Well passed its best - If anyone knows what species it is could you please let me know as I have not yet found it in my books.







                                      

They are vulnerable to hard winters and habitat degradation through pollution or unsympathetic management of watercourses. Kingfishers are amber listed because of their unfavourable conservation status in Europe.


Kingfishers are widespread, especially in central and southern England, becoming less common further north but following some declines last century, they are currently increasing in their range in Scotland. They are found by still or slow flowing water such as lakes, canals and rivers in lowland areas. In winter, some individuals move to estuaries and the coast. Occasionally they may visit garden ponds if of a suitable size.


Common kingfishers are important members of ecosystems and good indicators of freshwater community health. The highest densities of breeding birds are found in habitats with clear water, which permits optimal prey visibility, and trees or shrubs on the banks. These habitats have also the highest quality of water, so the presence of this bird confirms the standard of the water.


They frequent scrubs and bushes with overhanging branches close to shallow open water in which it hunts. In winter it is more coastal, often feeding in estuaries or harbours and along rocky seashores.



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Common Kingfisher  Alcedo atthis